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Back with a Bang: The Lightyears Explode

13 Sep
Photo Credit: Omar Iyer

The Lightyears Explode are an indie dance-pop / rock band from Mumbai, India. The band was formed in 2009 and quickly developed a following with an early win at the Channel[V] Launchpad in 2011. A short eponymous EP followed later that year, and later a full-length album – The Revenge of Kalicharan (2013). We at Top Five Records are great fans of this album, especially the unmistakeable Franz Ferdinand vibes on the dance-rock gem “I Am A Disco Dancer” and the debut-era Arctic Monkeys feels on “Diet Coke“.

After a long hiatus (save for the much poppier “Drunk Loser” in 2018), the Lightyears Explode are, thankfully, back. Their funk-drenched single “Satire” was released on September 4th, and has been on our daily playlists since. Our writer Madhoo took the opportunity to chat with the band about their origin story, influences, newfound appreciation for pop, and much more. Read on below!

Top Five Records: Tell me about the band! How did you guys start off? What’s your story?

Saurabh: We started around 2010 when we were still in college. At that point, we were more of a fast rock sort of band.

Jeremy: Yeah, like kind of punk, you know?

Saurabh: I’d say like more of an Arctic Monkeys-punk sound. And then we played a bunch of shows, released an album, The Revenge Of Kalicharan, and then we took a bit of a break for a while. I went to England for a while to study music production. When we came back, Jeremy joined us and here we are now!

Jeremy: 2015 was when we started up again, and now we’re working on new music.

TFR: Tell me about the name of your band. What’s behind the name?

Saurabh: First we were just called the Lightyears. I was a huge Toy Story fan. But it turns out that there was a band in England using that name already, and they sent us a message on MySpace.

Shalom: Haha, and it wasn’t a very polite message at that, it was very firm.

Saurabh: Yeah it was a British-polite. Like, it wasn’t an option, it was “Just change it!” If we’d known about them, we wouldn’t have tried to nick their name, you know? So we added in the ‘explode’ and it just sounded cool to us.

Jeremy: There was another option though. We considered being called The Mighty Scoundrels for a bit!

Saurabh: It’s good that we didn’t go with that. Actually, for just for a moment there, I was really into a genre of rock called psychobilly and I thought we should lean into that, and go with a gothic sort of name.

Shalom: Yeah, we even wore eyeliner for a day… but it was just for a shoot. (laughs)

Saurabh: Yeah, for a shoot, we tried to portray the whole look. You did the clown look, right?

Shalom: Yeah, I had the orange wig and makeup all over. The only good thing is that no one could tell it was me, unless I told them. It was a good disguise.

TFR: What would you guys say are your major influences? What were you guys listening to around the time you started the band?

Saurabh: Well, when we started the band, our influences were pretty different. I was really into Arctic Monkeys and Green Day mainly.

TFR: Yeah I definitely hear that in your early stuff!

Shalom: And Operation Ivy!

Saurabh: And the Fratellis, and the Beatles, obviously. Recently though, we’ve been really into HAIM, Jack Antonoff and his band the Bleachers, some Fleetwood Mac (especially Tango In The Night). And Jackson 5, stuff like that. I’d say we’ve really mellowed out recently.

TFR: We’re really obsessed with your first album, and we’ve always got a strong Franz Ferdinand vibe from it!

Shalom: Yeah definitely, we always did listen to a lot of Franz Ferdinand.

Saurabh: Yeah, we all grew up listening to a lot of this stuff – bands like the White Stripes, the Fratellis and all that. I guess you can really hear that.

TFR: So you mentioned that your music has become mellower over time. Any particular trigger?

Saurabh: So we were always playing, except for that brief hiatus. The new sound… it just sort of happened.

Jeremy: I’d say we kind of worked our way towards a more pop sound.

Shalom: Also, all of us really started listening to a lot more pop than we used to.

Saurabh: We started to re-establish music that we grew up listening to. For example, growing up, I personally really liked the Backstreet Boys.

Jeremy: Come on, everyone liked the Backstreet Boys!

Saurabh: But there was a point where we kind of had to stop and say “Uhh, no… we’re punk now.” But now, we’re just going back to it that stuff and we’re thinking, “Man, this is just awesome!” Amazing songwriting, well-produced, well-sung. And I see those songs in a different light now. Like Shania Twain, for example. (Proceeds to sing a snippet of “That Don’t Impress Me Much“)

TFR: With this pivot to a new sound, how has your process of songwriting changed? Compared to your process of making music for your last album, I mean.

Saurabh: [On the first album,] I’d write songs all over the place, sometimes in college, even. There was one song I wrote in class which was about me being in class and wanting it to just end already. That was really early on, though. So there was no process as such. This time, too, there wasn’t really a process in terms of songwriting. We worked until it sounded good to us and sent it off for mixing and the next steps.

Jeremy: This time, though, I’d say there’s a lot more production that’s done before we get into the jam room. It’s a bit more planned out- there’s an idea that we work out together. I wasn’t around for the first album, but I think it sounded a little like it was worked out together in the jam room.

Shalom: We also did a lot of demos for the newer stuff. We demoed it at Saurabh’s place and really thought about how it’d sound on an album, and how we’d replicate that song when we play it live. We paid more attention to that aspect of it, and I think it helped us look at our songwriting with a slightly different perspective. We really had to think of how the end product of this song would sound, while we were writing it.

Saurabh: I mean, we also demoed our first album, but it’s definitely different this time.

Shalom: Yeah, there’s definitely more production this time, and we’ve been a lot more serious with the demos as well.

Saurabh: Well, I had to get my money’s worth out of production school. It was so expensive!

Teaser for “Satire” released in early September 2020

TFR: Can you tell me about the direction you guys are taking with the new album?

Saurabh: So we’ve been separately writing a lot during lockdown. It sounds really saccharine, kind of retro. I feel like the more I write and the more we perform live, we get more and more comfortable with pop. It’s really easy for all of us – at least for me, growing up, it was – to make fun of pop music. But once you start doing it, it’s really not easy! The people who do it are really good at what they do. The appreciation of pop songwriting that we gained while writing this album is something we’re working towards. We’re trying to get more comfortable with being there.

TFR: You’re onto something there! I think pop has always been dismissed as something exclusively for teenage girls, and isn’t taken seriously much. I think it’s quite interesting to see this sort of reclamation of the pop genre, in a way.

Saurabh: I don’t know if pop needed reclamation, but for us personally, it definitely did.

TFR: How’s the coordination been during this pandemic? Has it been tough to work around that?

Saurabh: We were talking about that just now, about how difficult but adventurous it’s been to get a photo for our release. We’ve had to do a lot of stuff like this.

Jeremy: There’s definitely a lot more planning involved. Less trial-and-error when it comes to organisation!

Saurabh: Our album was mixed in Australia though. Since their lockdown rules were a bit more toned down, they were able to work on it while we were in lockdown. The writing took place over two years, but we’ve been finishing up now.

TFR: In a usual album release cycle, you’d probably go on tour and do shows. How does this work out for you in a situation like this?

Saurabh: So we’re working on putting out some videos. We’re also working on doing some live-streamed gigs, especially from some smaller studios around the city.

Shalom: There are a bunch of musicians doing that, right now.

Saurabh: I think artists are getting better at adapting to this new medium and we just have to get the hang of it.

TFR: Sounds great! I’ve seen a lot more artists adapting to Instagram for this age, and it feels like a lot of live music has become more accessible. What are your thoughts on this?

Saurabh: I’ve definitely seen a lot more shows and artists that I wouldn’t have been able to. I’d obviously have liked to see them in a gig, but now i can check these artists out at a later date. It’s easy to knock it because it might not sound or look as good as a live show. But something is better than nothing at all, you know?

I myself have discovered at least three or four new artists in this lockdown, just through their live streams. Though it’s not a physical gig, you still get to hear their work and interact with them. They’re putting their content out there for new people to enjoy, so I personally like it.

Shalom: Yeah, like Saurabh said, if you end up stumbling upon a new artist through live streams, you kind of go on a whole journey of looking them up, following them, checking them out on Spotify. Another cool thing is that you end up looking at an artist’s older work in this process, stuff you probably would’ve missed out on otherwise.

Jeremy: That brings in the feeling of a gig, in a way.

Shalom: Obviously I love live music, but this is the best we can do right now, you know?

Jeremy: There’s also something really nice about being able to attend gigs from all over the world, right on your couch. (laughs)

TFR: Speaking of gigs, what’s the best gig you guys have done?

Jeremy: Ooh, that’s a hard one.

Saurabh: Every gig is slightly different. In our most recent one, we got to play a lot of our newer stuff so that was fun!

Jeremy: But I think the gig we did at The Habitat was possibly the most fun.

Saurabh: The Koniac Net album release one!

Album art by Harmeet Rahal

TFR: What’s the next month looking like for you guys, in terms of releases and content?

Saurabh: We’re releasing our new song “Satire” on Sept 4th. [Ed. Note: This interview was conducted just before the song release.] We’re also working on some videos right now!

Shalom: We’re trying to put out songs consistently. As things start to open up, we’re also working on some videos and new content.

Saurabh: That’s something we’ve actually really enjoyed this time: working with other people. We were very insular before. Now with the artwork, the videos, and everything, we’ve really enjoyed this collaborative aspect.

TFR: Anyone you want to shout out from your team?

Saurabh: Our whole team: Achyint for producing, Ganesh for mixing, Richard for mastering, Harmeet for doing the artwork, Deepthi and Saket for working on the video!

Rapid Fire Round

TFR: Dream collab?

Saurabh: Danger Mouse

Shalom: Jack Antonoff

TFR: What are you listening to right now?

Saurabh: The last solo Brandon Flowers album, the new Killers album, and the new Taylor Swift album.

Shalom: The new HAIM album, King Princess and the first Yuck album – that’s a really good one. [Ed. Note: It is, indeed.]

Jeremy: I listen to a lot of electronic- jungle drum, bass, footwork. So SqaurePusher, Aphex Twin, that sort of stuff. They were way ahead of their time.

TFR: Desert island record?

Saurabh: In the Airplane Over the Sea [Neutral Milk Hotel]

Shalom: Any Beatles album – can’t go wrong with that!

Jeremy: Ultravisitor by SquarePusher

TFR: Describe your sound in three words!

Saurabh: Saccharine, dancey, poppy

Shalom: Poppy, jumpy, energetic

Jeremy: You guys pretty much covered it!

Listen to “Satire” by the Lightyears Explode wherever you get your music. And do give The Revenge of Kalicharan a spin – you won’t regret it!

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