Archive | June, 2015

Earl Sweatshirt: I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go Outside

12 Jun

I_Don't_Like_Shit,_I_Don't_Go_Outside_An_Album_by_Earl_Sweatshirt

Earl Sweatshirt is busy making his own music. I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go Outside is dark, honest and minimal in a way that is almost anti-commercial. It is also much harder than any of its peers. With his last album, Doris, he was already far in his own lane. Now, he has set up home there.

This is a confessional of an album. The stark beats perfectly frame his tales of depression and make his paranoia and pain even more jagged. He cuts through it with struts, going from “Focused on my chatter, ain’t as frantic as my thoughts/Lately I’ve been panicking a lot/Feeling like I’m stranded in a mob, scrambling for Xanax out the canister to pop” to “Fishy niggas stick to eating off of hooks/Say you eating, but we see you getting cooked, nigga” in the excellent “Grief” and from “And I’m low and I’m peakin/It’s cold in the deep end” to the anthemic “Ain’t no bitch in my DNA” in “DNA”, but the core is dark. It takes a lot from the artist to bare himself like this, and the fact that most don’t dare makes this all the more powerful.

I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go Outside requires work from its listener but this is a person laid bare, and a person who doesn’t require effort is a person not worth listening to. This album is definitely worth listening to.

@murthynikhil

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Young Thug: Barter 6

4 Jun

This would be a unique album by any standard, but dropping The Barter 6 into the modern rap scene is almost iconoclastic. Young Thug does draw his fair share from Lil Wayne’s well, but his sound is very immediately distinct.

This album in particular does a masterful job of presenting what exactly that sound can be. His singing and rapping meld into each other smoothly, aided in part by his borderline unintelligible flow. There is just an awareness of sound here that is exceptional. His voice harmonizes with the beat enough to groove you in and then chops it to jolt you back up. While he lacks the awareness that normally comes with rap (despite a Mike Brown line in OD, this is not by any means a political album) this makes for a very new sound.

This is not a flawless album, some of the guest spots in particular leave a lot to be desired, but this is still a very good album and a very intriguing one as well. I can’t promise that you will like it, but you should definitely at least try it.

@murthynikhil

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